The Hailey Historic Preservation Commission

Hailey Main Street at Croy Street looking North 1913.

Gone by the Wayside

These properties no longer grace our fine city.

Fox Home Built in 1882-3 by J.C. and Florence Fox, this was the grandest home in Hailey. Of Queen Anne style, the house was gutted by fire in 1946 and the third story with its cupola and many-angled roof lines was not restored.

Photo Fox Home
Fox Home

Photo

S. J. Friedman Home: A few weeks after Hailey was platted S. J. opened his general store on Main Street in a 20' x 40' tent where he sold dry goods, clothing, boots and shoes. He designed and supervised the building of his permanent store, which featured a roof covered with one foot of dirt and steel shutters attached to every window. As the 1889 raging fire wiped out four blocks of both sides of the street, Simon stayed inside his building. Both he and the building survived. In recognition of Hailey's first fireproof building and Simon's bravery the Union Insurance Company sent him a letter of thanks accompanied by a silver pitcher and tray.


Photo
Wood River Times

Wood River Times: On Croy at Main. This location has served as the space for many early businesses. T. C. Picotte pitched a tent here in 1881 and then built a log building to house his paper and printing business, The Wood River Times. Picotte was as outrageous an editor as any on the frontier and was horsewhipped a number of times for his paper's published personal attacks. His staff followed the leader; one editor ended up with two gunshot wounds. The building also housed the first telephone exchange in the Territory of Idaho, which opened October 1, 1883. Three operators worked eight-hour shifts around the clock and were the lifeline for the community. It was a sad day in August 1963 when the system switched to dial phones. The operators were faster circulating the news than the weekly paper, and listening in on the party line was even better than gossiping at the soda fountain.


Odd Fellows Hall
Odd Fellows Hall

Odd Fellows Hall: Built by Dr. Earl William Fox in 1920, it was heated from water piped in from the Hailey Hot springs. The first floor housed a saloon, the first National Bank of Hailey and a jewelry store. The second floor housed the 10-room hospital, which continued into the 1960s. Many townspeople were born under the skylight, which was replicated twice more when the building was renovated in 1984. Doc Fox was born in 1887 and raised in Hailey. He received his education at the Barnes Medical School at the University of St. Louis and did post graduate study at the Mayo Clinic. He gave 41 years of medical service to the community. For his long-distance calls he used the forerunner of the snowmobile, powered by an airplane engine. The Hailey Public Library and City Hall now occupies the space that formerly housed the Odd Fellows Hall, the State Theater, owned by Sonny Osborne, and the J. C. Fox Building.


First National Bank
First National Bank

First National Bank: A stone wall from the first permanent building at this site survived the fire of July, 1889 and may be seen from the back parking lot. The original two story First National Bank was built here about 1900. Now the site is home to Wells Fargo. The present building was constructed in 1967.


Alturas Hotel
Alturas Hotel







Alturas (Hiawatha) Hotel Site:
First Ave. and Croy Street (Now Atkinsons' Market) Construction began in 1883 and was completed in 1885 at a cost of $65,000. The three-story brick hotel, which featured a wood stove in every room, was billed as "the finest 82 room hotel between Denver and the West Coast." Apartments were in 1915. It burned in 1899. When rebuilt, hot water was piped from the Hailey Hot Springs west of town to heat the building and provide water for the plunge in the back where many townspeople learned to swim. A fire in January 1979 marked the final end of a proud Hailey landmark.


F. E. Ensign Home Site
F. E. Ensign Home Site

F. E. Ensign Home Site: Francis Edward and Margaret Reid Ensign purchased this property in 1881. F.E. was admitted to the law profession in 1858 in Yreka, California; moved to Silver City in 1868 he was elected to the Territorial Council of Idaho for Owyhee County and was chairman of the Judiciary Committee of that body. He came to Hailey as the attorney for the Idaho and Oregon Land Improvement Co., then the owners of the new Hailey town site. He ruled over a precedent setting court case concerning water rights in Quigley Gulch. This case set standards for water right issues that are still used today. His law career lasted 50 years.


Hailey Depot
Hailey Depot

Union Pacific (Oregon Short Line) Depot Site: A brass band, orators and much ado greeted the first train on May 23, 1883. With the railroad came the telegraph and Hailey was connected with the rest of the world. Townspeople and newspaper reporters gathered at the depot for each arrival and departure of the daily train. Trains stopped coming to Wood River Valley in 1981.


Aukema Drug Store (on corner)
Aukema Drug Store (on corner)

Aukema Drugstore Site: John C. Baugh was an early druggist in town. He and his wife Clara Silver Baugh built this building in 1904. Mark W. Aukema worked for him and for J. J. Tracy, and later leased the building from Baugh. Mark's son Edgar M. Andrews followed his father in the drugstore business. The building was raised and a new E. G. Willis business plaza was built by Bruce Willis and named for his father.


Snug Bar Site: Ernest Hemingway and friends frequented the location. This area was the hub of downtown Hailey businesses around the turn of the century. The site now houses the businesses of Colortime, T.J's Electronics, Mountain Paints and Basic's Plus Pet Supplies.


J C Fox Store
J C Fox Store

J. C. Fox Store: Fox finally limited his store to women's dresses and accessories, notions and dry goods. In the middle of the store was a "pretty little fountain, furnishing pure water at all times to patrons." Fox went on buying trips to the big cities and brought back the latest fashions for all the women of Hailey. After hours, he would open his store to the women of River Street, who entered by the back door, to do their shopping.


The Original Mint Bar
The Original Mint Bar

The Mint: Located on lots 15 and 16 in Block 33 of the City of Hailey is the site of the current Mint. Several former businesses, Brook's Tavern, Ensign, Davies and Ensign and the original Mint were housed on these same lots.


Clarendon Hot Springs
Clarendon Hot Springs
Cline's Rooming House on Croy at Main
Cline's Rooming House
on Croy at Main
Hailey Dec 1931
Hailey Dec 1931
Mallory Photo


Idaho Electric Supply Company Site: On February 17, 1887, Hailey was the first municipality in the Idaho Territory to produce electricity. The water was diverted from the Wood River (near War Dairy) into the Trail Race Canal. Electricity was generated at a site located on the end of West Silver Street. The First business office for the West Coast Power was located on the SE corner of Croy and Main Mountain Pizza. Pearl Rockwell collected the first power bills. This building was destroyed by fire in 1888.



Hailey House 1916
Hailey House 1916
Dog Races—Main St. East between Carbonate and Bullion
Dog Races—Main St. East between
Carbonate and Bullion
Hailey Grade School
Hailey Grade School

Basque Boarding House Site: Established c. 1910 by Eusebio and Pia Unamuno Arriaga for "Basques only." Basque sheepherders and sheepmen were guaranteed a hot bath, scrumptious dinners followed by cigars and cafe royales, a game of cards and dancing and singing to the accompaniment of guitars, concertinas and spoons.



WA Brodhead Jan 1906
WA Brodhead Jan 1906
Main St Lee George Gas - Curtis Bakery - Jacobs Variety
Main St Lee George Gas - Curtis
Bakery - Jacobs Variety
Mallory Photo
Main St looking NW
Main St looking NW
SJ Friedman Business

Dot Allen's House Site: Always referred to by both names, Dot Allen was the undisputed "boss of River Street" and "handsome John Donnelly was her right hand man." Hailey folklore has it that she was a very beautiful woman – always gorgeously dressed. Other houses of prostitution north of Bullion Street and on both sides of River Street included Lizzie's, Anita's, Mary's, Gloria's, Georgia's, and Mabel's. Just before midnight September 21, 1911, during an attempted robbery, Dot Allen's piano player, M. J. Crowley, was shot dead. After an ugly investigation, compromising many stalwarts of the town, Charles Allen and Reece Clevenger were found guilty of murder and Charles Crawford and Lorenzo Swift were convicted as accomplices. Dot Allen continued in business for some years, but no one ever knew what finally became of her. In the early 1900s this became the site of the pelota (Basque handball) court. There was an adobe Basque boarding house immediately to the south.

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